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Citation, Style Manual, and Grammar Resource Guide: Online Citation Guides

Online Guides for Preparing a Bibliography and Doing Other Academic Writing Tasks

Citing Your Sources - MLA Style 8th Edition
If you want a good brief introduction to MLA style, with plenty of examples from our subscriptions, books and databases, take a look at this guide by our Librarians. Because formatting can become unreliable in HTML, the guide itself is a word document. Look for the link in the middle of the opening page.

 
Citing Your Sources - APA Style
Similarly, for a basic introduction to APA style, take a look at this LibGuide, also by our Reference Staff.

 
APA Style Help
http://www.apastyle.org/apa-style-help.aspx
This APA webpage has very limited free information, including an FAQ that covers some citation questions, and a free online tutorial.

 
Chicago Manual of Style: Tools: Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide
http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
Although less used today than it was twenty years ago, many people--including some Suffolk faculty--still prefer the "Chicago" or "Turabian" style of referencing. The publisher, the University of Chicago Press, provides this web "Quick Guide," which is part of a larger "Tools" section. (Explore other tool pages on topics like Manuscript Preparation and Proofreading by clicking the topics in the left frame.) Besides the examples provided here, you might want to take a look at the Q & A section, as well.

 
EasyBib's Visual Guide to Citations
http://www.easybib.com/ebook
One of the online citation tools mentioned on a previous page, EasyBib has this interesting citation guide that show students where they can find the different pieces of information they need for their bibliography. Navigate from options on the left.  Examples point out where to find the different information needed for a "works cited" list like titles, authors, copyright dates and volume numbers.
 
Columbia Guide to Online Style
http://books.google.com/books?id=s0gU0tUSSxQC
Here is a Google Book edition of The Columbia Guide to Online Style by Janice R. Walker and Todd Taylor (Columbia University Press, 2006). This Columbia University Press book explains citing electronic sources, first describing the general principles, and then providing examples in both "humanities style" (like MLA and Chicago), and "scientific style" (like APA and CBE). [Note: Google Books can be browsed, searched and read, but cannot be printed. Also, Google Books usually provide an array of "Related Book" that it has in its system. Just be advised that for some, only selected pages will be available.]
 
Citing Sources and Listing References
http://www.mhhe.com/mayfieldpub/tsw/csxlr.htm
This handy webpage is associated with the Mayfield Handbook of Technical & Scientific Writing. Especially useful for scientific writers, the rest of the site is also worth exploring. This section, number 10, deals specifically with citations. It provides some tips related to MLA and APA style, but also Chicago and the more scientific styles from the Council of Biology Editors (CBE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) system.
 
Council of Science Editors: Scientific Style and Format
http://www.councilscienceeditors.org/publications/scientific-style-and-format/
The CSE (formerly the CBE) has just revised their biology style manual entitled Scientific Style and Format. The Page for this new edition does include the introduction, preface, the "complete index" (as a PDF), and other explanatory materials, but it does NOT include any real examples of the citation style itself.

 
ACS Style Guidelines Quick Guide
http://lib.berkeley.edu/CHEM/acsstyle.html
The American Chemical Society used to provide a page with handy examples of their own style of citation. It no longer does. But this quick guide from The Chemistry Library at the UC Berkeley still provides a useful summary of the American Chemical Society style of citation.